Review of: Lol Eports

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 15.04.2020
Last modified:15.04.2020

Summary:

Die begrenzte Anzahl von GlГcksspieloptionen, bei denen es bis zu 100 Freispiele zu gewinnen, mГchte oft seinen Account kГndigen, den Datenabgleich schnellstmГglich abzuschlieГen - vorausgesetzt.

Lol Eports

↑ What is the World Championship? In: LoL eSports. (5logi.com [​abgerufen am September ]). ↑. LOL Esports. Gefällt Mal · Personen sprechen darüber. Official account of LoL Esports. Learn more at 5logi.com Not just an esport. The future of sport. And Worlds is our time to Take Over. The journey to crown the greatest League of Legends team on the planet starts.

League of Legends World Championship

LOL Esports. Gefällt Mal · Personen sprechen darüber. Official account of LoL Esports. Learn more at 5logi.com Mehr von LOL Esports auf Facebook anzeigen. Anmelden. Passwort vergessen? oder. Neues Konto erstellen. Jetzt nicht. Ähnliche Seiten. League of Legends. ALIENWARE X LEAGUE OF LEGENDS ESPORTS. ALIENWARE AURORA. Setzen von Maßstäben bei E-Sports. Alles zählt.

Lol Eports Navigation menu Video

TFT Fates - North America Regional Qualifiers (Game 5)

Lol Eports

Earning 4, gold more than anyone else in the game, his skill paid off and net him yet another win. Analysis: Hybrid used Karma to help Origen to a Game 1 win.

He was effective as Origen sieged their way to victory, using Inner Flame to poke down H2K health bars and using his shields and speed boosts to keep Origen in good position to knock down objectives.

In Game 2, Hybrid used Thresh and played well. He showed off good mechanics, threading the needle to land Death Sentence throughout the game. He picked up an assist on first blood and although Origen lost the game, Hybrid played well in this split series.

Analysis: xPeke helped lead Origen to a Game 1 win on Lucian. He helped siege with his ultimate and picked up two kills in the final teamfight of the game.

Best of all his positioning was good this game, as he wasn't caught out once to give away easy kills, ending with a game high three kills.

In Game 2, xPeke again used Lucian and played well. He picked up first blood and a kill in the mid game to allow Origen to pick up Baron.

He wasn't able to carry Origen to a win in Game 2, but his good positioning in this series as a whole was a huge step forward in his progression as an AD Carry.

He hardly missed any Piercing Arrows, helping Origen siege all game long by chunking down H2K health bars. PoE didn't have a ton of kills, but his poke damage helped Origen siege to a victory.

PowerOfEvil used Karma in Game 2. He picked up his first kill during a 3-vs-2 fight in the bottom lane, but struggled as Origen fell behind.

He was able to pick up a kill in the mid game that allowed OG to take the Baron, but with multiple members killed after securing the buff.

Analysis: Amazing used Olaf to help Origen to a Game 1 win. He picked up an assist on first blood and used his ultimate to charge through H2K's multiple crowd control abilities in the late game to set up kills while Origen sieged.

Amazing used Olaf again in Game 2 and had varying success. He was able to pick up kills and threaten the H2K back line in teamfights, but he was also killed repeatedly as Origen fell behind.

If anything he proved that he can play Olaf, but that the champion struggles when falling behind. He picked up first blood onto Odoamne and used his ultimate to make plays across the map.

This was an extremely slow game, but sOAZ split pushed well late aided by the Baron buff to allow Origen to open the base.

Origen was dominated for most of this game, except for one mid game teamfight where sOAZ picked up his lone kill.

This allowed Origen to take Baron, but multiple members died in the aftermath to slow their push and comeback. Analysis: VandeR used Nami to set up good damage in Game 1 early on.

Things went south in the late game however, as he was unable to set up kills and Origen eventually sieged their way to a win.

He was killed to give away first blood and finished with five deaths overall in the game. While he was killed a lot, he also helped H2K in teamfights by landing Aqua Prisons and his Tidal Wave to set up kills, ending with nine assists.

He was mainly anonymous, unable to pick up any kills in the entirety of the game. There wasn't much action in Game 1 as Origen won a slow game.

Freeze was much better on Ezreal in Game 2. He picked up multiple kills in the late game as he scaled including a triple kill in the final teamfight to help H2K close the game.

Freeze must be more involved for H2K to reach the heights expected of them this split. He picked up a kill in the first teamfight of the game, but was unable to help win late game teamfights as Origen starved out H2K in a slow game.

Ryu used Viktor to help H2K win Game 2. He only ended the game with two kills, but his burst damage in teamfights allowed him to pick up a game high 10 assists.

While he wasn't picking up the kills, he was able to chunk down multiple members of Origen in fights with his full rotation of spells, allowing other members of H2K to pick up execute kills.

Analysis: Jankos used Elise to start off well in Game 1. He was able to pick up three kills early, responding well to a gank in the top lane to kill xPeke in the bottom lane.

As the game wore on he lost his effectiveness. In Game 2, Jankos dominated on Elise. He picked up a double kill in the mid game and helped H2K dominate teamfights combining his burst damage and cocoon to set up kills, including six for himself.

Overall his cocoon accuracy was poor in comparison to his usual games, but when push came to shove Jankos landed the crowd control to help H2K tie the series.

He was killed early to give away first blood and struggled to set up kills in this slow game. Odoamne took Shen in Game 2 and helped H2K dominate.

He was killed during a 1-vs-3 turret dive early, but survived long enough to pick up a return kill. He scaled well into the mid game and was nearly unkillable in teamfights, using his ultimate to shield carries and landing his Shadow Dash on multiple Origen members.

He even picked up a double kill in the mid game after Origen secured Baron to lessen the effects of the buff. Analysis: Mithy had a strong Game 1 on Braum.

He was able to play the off tank role perfectly for G2 alongside of Expect. He set up multiple kills with his Concussive Blows passive and helped G2 engage with his Glacial Fissure for an easy Game 1 win.

In Game 2, Mithy used Bard and again was a playmaker. He was able to set up kills using his Tempered Fate and Cosmic Bindings to lock members of Fnatic in place during teamfights.

He also showed good use of Tempered Fate to save his teammates from dangerous situations, often prolonging their lives in the process.

Analysis: Zven carried G2 to a Game 1 win on Jhin. He was able to stay safe throughout the game, dealing damage from long range with his ultimate.

He picked up a double kill in the second teamfight of the game and a triple kill in the final teamfight to close out Game 1.

Zven played a more utility role on Ashe in Game 2. He picked up an assist on first blood and showed good Enchanted Crystal Arrow accuracy throughout the game to pick up 10 assists.

While his two kills was a low total for Game 2, his 12 KDA was excellent. Analysis: Perkz used Zilean to support G2 in Game 1.

He was able to pick up three kills in the game, but really helped with Zilean's utility in teamfights. He was able to speed up Trick to engage on the Fnatic backline and used his ultimate to resurrect members of his team to continue fighting.

Perkz used Ryze in Game 2 to help G2 dominate Fnatic. He picked up a kill onto Febiven with help from Trick and solo killed Gamsu early.

He didn't pick up many kills, but his burst damage chunked down Fnatic for his teammates to pick up execute kills. Analysis: Trick used Olaf to help G2 to a Game 1 victory.

He picked up first blood on Gamsu and a kill in the first teamfight of the game. Trick proved a threat all game long, sprinting onto the Fnatic backline to disrupt their carries in teamfights.

Things went even better for Trick in Game 2 on Nidalee. He picked up a kill on Spirit early and two kills in the first teamfight of the game.

He went off picking up a triple kill in the second teamfight of the game and dealt huge burst damage, leading to a game high nine kills.

Analysis: Expect piled up the assists in Game 1 on Gnar. He was able to pick up an assist on first blood and provided G2 with an excellent front line tank in teamfights.

He used his ultimate and Mega Gnar form to stun members of Fnatic to set up kills. Expect crushed it again on Gnar in Game 2.

He was able to pick up first blood, leading to a double kill early, and a kill in the first teamfight of the game. G2 took a huge lead and Expect was unkillable in Game 2 on the front line.

Analysis: Yellowstar was unable to make plays in Game 1 on Karma. He struggled to set up kills as Fnatic fell behind early and never caught up, ending the game with only three assists.

In Game 2, it was much of the same on Alistar. Analysis: Rekkles was mostly anonymous in Game 1 on Ezreal. He was unable to carry Fnatic and picked up his lone kill in the late game, catching Expect out of position.

In Game 2, Rekkles used Jhin and again struggled. He picked up two kills, but lacked the damage needed to turn teamfights as Fnatic fell behind.

He kept decent position, but G2 ran through Fnatic in Game 2. Analysis: Febiven played Viktor in Game 1 and did most of Fnatic's damage. He picked up two of Fnatic's three kills, killing Mithy early and picking up a kill in the first teamfight of the game.

It wasn't enough as G2 took a convincing Game 1 win. Febiven used Viktor again in Game 2 and struggled.

He was killed often, ending the game with five deaths, and was unable to really turn teamfights as G2 dominated Fnatic. Analysis: Spirit struggled in Game 1 on Graves.

He was unable to have an effect on the early game and couldn't carry Fnatic once they fell behind.

He finished the game with no kills and only three assists. Things didn't get much better in Game 2 on Elise. He was able to pick up a kill onto Mithy early, but again struggled to do much for Fnatic as they were dominated by G2, ending the game with only three assists.

Analysis: Gamsu played Shen in Game 1 and was mostly anonymous. He was killed to give away first blood and was unable to really set up kills for Fnatic.

His lone highlight was using his ultimate to set up a kill onto Mithy in the early game for Febiven. He was killed again to give away first blood and was really unable to one-shot members of G2 at any point in the game.

Analysis: Vizicsacsi's Shen was crucial to Unicorns' win in Game 1. Dominating his lane despite a difficult champion matchup against Wunder's Gnar, Vizicsacsi would make room to use his Stand United ultimate to secure first blood for Exileh at 10 minutes.

Vizicsacsi was donated the Rift Herald buff at 13 minutes, which Vizicsacsi would use to shove lanes with impunity. Game 2 wasn't as fortunate for Vizicsacsi, with Vizicsacsi's Trundle securing an early solo kill, but immediately dying afterwards at seven minutes.

Across the map, the Unicorns were struggling to generate any momentum, and Vizicsacsi was unable to split push due to Trashy's pressure and Wunder's huge gold lead.

Analysis: Move's form against Splyce can be best described as mercurial, carrying UoL in Game 1 and dragging the team to a loss in Game 2.

Game 1, Move was fantastic on Rek'Sai, picking up first blood for Exileh at 10 minutes, roaming around the map to get UoL's duo lane ahead, and generally applying pressure wherever UoL needed.

In Game 2, however, Move's Rek'Sai looked like a fish out of water, unable to be in the right place at the right time while getting outclassed in the jungle by Trashy's Nidalee, who held a three level lead over Move at nine minutes.

Exileh would then solo kill Sencux at 12 minutes, snowballing out of control. Exileh looked to repeat his performance in Game 2 on LeBlanc, but he was never given a chance to take over the game.

After getting killed by Mikyx after a close trade at six minutes, Sencux's Azir dominated the lane, preventing Exileh from playing a part in the early-mid game.

Analysis: Veritas had a great performance in Game 1 as Jhin, winning his lane early along with Hylissang and farming well throughout the early game.

With Move ganking bottom lane twice in the early game, at 12 and 15 minutes, respectively, Veritas was able to snowball very quickly.

Game 2 saw Veritas continue to play Jhin, but with much less success. While Veritas farmed well, Splyce was able to gain advantages across the map, keeping the pressure advantage.

Analysis: Hylissang's play-making abilities were on full display on Bard during Game 1. Landing several tricky Cosmic Bindings and Tempered Fates, Hylissang's ability to lock Splyce down led to early game advantages for the Unicorns, which UoL snowballed into the mid and late game.

Hylissang enjoyed less success on Nami in Game 2, despite a good laning phase. With UoL giving up advantages across the map, Hylissang was unable to produce the momentum needed for the Unicorns to take control of Game 2.

Analysis: Wunder's performance on Gnar left a lot to be desired in Game 1, losing lane to Vizicsacsi's Shen despite having the "favored" champion matchup.

Wunder had poor TP usage throughout the game, often ignoring multi-man skirmishes in favor of shoving his lane while Vizicsacsi used his huge global pressure with two global abilities to snowball UoL ahead.

Game 2 found Wunder again on Gnar, and this time with more success. Receiving near constant attention from junglers, the volatile top lane snowballed in Wunder's favor, and Wunder was able to TP around the map to set his team up for success.

Analysis: Trashy lived up to his name in Game 1 on Nidalee, getting outclassed by jungle counterpart Move. Move was able to make aggressive plays and ganks work for Unicorns, while Trashy was often late to skirmishes and generally had poor positioning.

Playing Nidalee again in Game 2, Trashy's play dramatically improved, beginning at seven minutes, when Trashy would kill Move under his own tier one top turret.

Power-farming as only Nidalee can, Trashy held a whopping three level lead over Move at nine minutes, which Trashy used to shut Move down and snowball Splyce ahead.

Analysis: Sencux had a rough time in Game 1 on Karma, with Sencux getting ganked by Move and Vizicsacsi at 10 minutes to give Exileh's Anivia first blood.

Exileh would snowball heavily, solo-killing Sencux at 12 minutes, and effectively shutting Sencux out of the game. Behind in gold and experience, Sencux was forced to play passively as to avoid getting picked by Exileh.

Sencux played Azir in Game 2 to more success, dueling Exileh's LeBlanc early for Mikyx to roam and secure first blood at six minutes. Once Sencux got ahead, there was nothing Exileh could do to prevent Sencux from taking over the game.

Analysis: Kobbe's Lucian in Game 1 got heavily abused by UoL, receiving constant attention from Move in the early game.

UoL would send multiple members to gank Kobbe and lane partner Mikyx, setting Kobbe far behind while snowballing the game out of control for UoL.

Game 2 found Kobbe on Caitlyn, where he found much more success. Able to lane without outside interference, Kobbe was even in power with Veritas throughout the early game.

Once the mid game teamfighting began, Kobbe's positioning was brilliant, remaining safe while dealing 20, damage to enemy champions, the second highest amount in the game.

Analysis: Mikyx's Braum in Game 1 left a lot to be desired, as he was constantly out of position. After getting roamed on and killed by multi-man ganks from UoL, Mikyx found himself far behind in experience and gold, even for a support.

Despite the setbacks, though, Mikyx still tried to make plays for his team, starting teamfights and playing aggressively, but Splyce was unwilling to back him up.

Mikyx's Karma in Game 2 was far better, with Mikyx's aggression earning him first blood, when he ganked mid at six minutes and killed a low-health Exileh.

With a solid lead, and Splyce's newfound confidence, Mikyx was able to control vision and use Karma's utility to empower Splyce. Analysis: KaSing might be known as a "play-making support," but his passive play prevented Vitality from picking up a series win.

Game 1 went well for KaSing's Braum, roaming around the map to help secure an early gold lead for Vitality. With his team's early lead, KaSing was able to dominate the vision game with a game-high 51 wards placed, as Vitality finished a scrappy Game 1 in 37 minutes.

Game 2 found KaSing playing Braum for a second time, but with much less success. While Vitality were able to secure an early gold lead through early rotations and skirmishing, KaSing had a less pronounced impact on the game.

With Cabochard's Kennen unable to initiate for Vitality, KaSing looked apprehensive about starting fights, despite Vitality's massive gold lead in the mid game.

With Vitality on the backfoot, Schalke took over the game. Schalke dominated the vision game after taking the lead at around 31 minutes, and quickly closed out the game with superior teamfighting.

Earning a game-high CS, Police's waveclear helped Vitality snowball an early lead, able to quickly shove down turrets and engage fights with Police's On The Hunt ultimate.

Through a strong early and mid game, Vitality was able to pick up the 37 minute win. Game 2 found Police on more of a carry role as Lucian, but Vitality's problems prevented Police from taking over the game.

With Schalke's heavy engage composition, and Lucian's low range, Police was forced to play conservatively, dealing only 9, damage to enemy champions.

Analysis: Nukeduck's Ryze was strong throughout Game 1, roaming around the map and skirmishing well with the rest of Vitality.

After picking up a kill onto sprattel at nine minutes, Nukeduck started to snowball out of control. Game 2 found Nukeduck on Varus, where he enjoyed only limited success.

Despite an early Vitality lead, and another game-high in damage dealt to enemy champions with 18, damage, Nukeduck was unable to find kills.

In Game 1, Shook's Nidalee was a monster: counterjungling Gilius, applying pressure across the map, securing kills, including first blood, and taking over the game as a carry jungler should.

Shook's Elise in Game 2, however, left a lot to be desired. Shook looked lost throughout Game 2, despite Vitality controlling the early game.

Shook was often on the wrong side of the map during skirmishes, and generally had a low impact on the game. Analysis: Cabochard's Irelia got off to a strong start in Game 1, picking up an assist as Shook killed Steve for first blood at four minutes.

With Cabochard fed, and Vitality firing on all cylinders, Vitality was able to end the game in 37 minutes on the back of a Cabochard triple kill in Schalke's base.

Cabochard's Kennen was effective early on in Game 2, securing first blood for his team with a TP flank and his Slicing Maelstrom at eight minutes.

As the game went on, however, Cabochard would repeat this play to limited success, as he would get immediately exhausted and killed. With Cabochard's struggles, Vitality were without engagement options, allowing Schalke to take control of the game with decisive teamfighting.

Analysis: Hustlin played excellently in Game 1 on Braum. He was able to fast push the bottom turret early, but really showed up in teamfights. He effectively blocked damage with Unbreakable and set up multiple kills using Concussive Blows and Glacial Fissure, which allowed his carries to dominate teamfights.

It was a similar story for Hustlin in Game 2 as Braum. Once again he played outstandingly, using his ultimate and passive to set up kills.

Hustlin ended with a series-high 25 assists. He was able to fast push the bottom lane tier one turret early, but gave away a kill after being caught out of position early.

His play was incredible during this series, possibly prompting future Jhin bans against him by other teams.

He showed good damage throughout the game, picking up first blood with help from Maxlore onto Betsy. In Game 2, NighT used Karma's utility in a comeback win.

Analysis: Maxlore set up multiple kills in Game 1 on Rek'Sai. He farmed well during the lane swap and helped NighT pick up first blood, ganking Betsy in the mid lane.

This trend would continue as Maxlore piled on the assists in teamfights, making good use of his knockup to set up easy kills for GIANTS.

He was able to deal strong burst damage in the mid and late game to pull GIANTS back into the lead as they took the series sweep.

He was able to pick up kills and assists throughout the game, showing excellent burst damage in teamfights. SmittyJ again used Rumble to good result in Game 2.

He helped fast push down the tier one top turret early, but was unable to do much else. In Game 2, Raise played better on Bard.

Steeelback played well in Game 2 again on Lucian. With his team behind, he couldn't fully carry, but finished the game with only one death to four kills and seven assists.

Analysis: Betsy used Swain in Game 1, but was unable to carry. In Game 2, Betsy used Azir and again struggled.

He used his ultimate well to set up kills onto NighT in the mid lane early on, but struggled to carry in late game teamfights as GIANTS finished the sweep.

Analysis: Airwaks struggled in Game 1 playing Hecarim. He used his ultimate to try and scare GIANTS, but with his team behind, they were unable to really follow up his crowd control properly.

In Game 2, Airwaks used Gragas. Analysis: In Game 1, Parang played Lissandra and struggled. He helped fast push the tier one top lane turret and picked up a kill in the first teamfight before falling off.

He was unable to turn the tides for ROCCAT in teamfights, missing multiple roots and dying before really locking down priority targets.

In Game 2, Parang used Jayce and again struggled. He was able to help get ROCCAT off to an early game lead and split pushed in the mid game to take the bottom inhibitor.

Parang has been unimpressive on his signature champion in two tries this split. Analysis: As SKT seems to be in their standard summer slump, Duke is not an exception to the team's underperformance.

He started off the series with a rather underwhelming performance on Rumble. As Ever earned an early advantage in the game, he tried desperately to group with his team, but could not find a favorable ultimate to win fights.

Finding only a single kill, it came from catching LokeN off guard and using his protobelt, flash and ultimate to do so.

As Ever gained dragon control, Duke fell with the rest of his team, leading to 38 minute defeat. He stepped his play up in Game 2 despite a rocky start.

Getting ganked repeatedly, he fell and Ever took another early lead. To come back in the game, he used his teleport and grouped with the rest of SKT to secure a teamfight victory at 15 minutes and pick up back-to-back dragons.

With two Infernal Drakes under their belt, the team was able to secure a Baron and push into Ever's base to secure a quick victory in response.

Duke's success was limited to this game, as he once again was unable to perform in the final game of the series. Although he didn't do terribly in the game, everyone around him seemed to crumble, with the exception of Bang.

Using their momentum, they secured three Barons and five dragons to close out the game in convincing fashion and claim the series win.

With the defeat, SKT is slowly losing grasp of their Playoffs spot and will need to improve if they wish to qualify for the World Championship.

They opted to start Blank, which ended up being the incorrect decision. He started off Game 1 on Rek'Sai and was unable to do much of anything. As Bless gained early control of the map, Blank found no openings to counter him.

As his team fell behind, he didn't attempt to bring the team back, simply farming up as his team continued to suffer. Only able to pick up a single dragon, his pressure didn't come close to Ever's.

As they controlled the rest of objectives, he sat by idly as his team was slowly choked out of the game.

Participating in only two kills in the defeat, he was underwhelming to say the least. Due to his performance, the team opted to sub him out for Bengi for the remainder of the series.

Analysis: The series started off with Faker's Azir getting focused early on. After his team had begun to fall behind, Ever turned focus towards him to keep him from bringing his team back.

They did so effectively, unable to pick up kills on him, they simply prevented him from doing much in teamfights.

As his team fell behind, Faker tried desperately to bring them back, picking up all his team's kills but one. Despite the effort, Ever's early control led them to a convincing victory in Game 1.

SKT and Faker answered back in Game 2, determined not to go down without a fight. Although he fell behind again early, his performance in teamfights shined, turning the game around during a dragon fight 15 minutes into the game.

With a rather low kill count, he moved with his team to pressure Ever and secure objectives to take an early Baron and push into the enemy base.

As final fights erupted, Faker found the upper hand, closing out the game to even the series score. Game 3 saw a substantially different performance, as Faker began to falter.

After Ever's bottom lane roamed early to pick up a kill on Faker, he fell behind as the enemy also picked up dragons.

He was repeatedly focused, making his Karma nearly useless in the game. Ever struggled to close out the game, but picked up several Barons and five dragons to slowly dominate SKT.

Faker was nowhere to be found in the loss, assisting in only one kill in the defeat. With the loss, Ever won the series Analysis: Although Bang often plays Sivir and a supportive style, he is frequently known for picking up a large number of kills and boasting an impressive KDA.

This was not the case in SKT's series defeat as he failed to pick up a single kill until the final game.

He fell early in Game 1 just as minions were spawning, resulting in an extremely rough early game that snowballed hard. As Ever found early leads, he was unable to do anything while his team was constantly caught out.

Once behind, there was no way back into the game as he did little more than farm in the 38 minute defeat. Game 2 saw a much better performance, but he was once again unable to pick up a kill.

As the team fell behind early, he held his own in anticipation of a teamfight to bring it back SKT's way. This finally happened around a dragon 15 minutes into the game, resulting in SKT taking a lead.

With their new found dragon, they controlled objectives and slowly choked out Ever to claim victory in just 33 minutes.

Bang kept up his performance in Game 3, but it was not enough. As his team fell behind, he was able to do little more than survive on Ezreal.

When he finally found a kill, it was far too late, as Ever had taken control of the game. His team fell left and right as he was forced to play from behind.

Similarly to Game 1, once Ever had control, they slowly amassed a large lead through objective control that forced Bang to play far back. Update: Impactful has been suspeneded for four months after it was confirmed he was Elo boosting, Daniel Rosen of theScore reports.

Analysis: Joining Impactful on the suspension train is Papa Chau and k2soju, two players relegated to the bench on their respective Challenger squads.

While the latter two players garnered a three-month suspension from Riot, Impactful was given a four month ban thanks to reports that he provided "significantly more" boosting than the other two players.

He had a hard time in Game 1 while mlxg was able to snowball all of RNG's lanes early. Mata was able to roam around, help get objectives and further pressure RNG's already winning lanes, but MorZB was stuck in the one lane and didn't end up having hardly any use in a game without teamfighting.

Game 3 was the same story, losing in the bottom lane, never getting a chance to roam or create teamfights, and NewBee went down twice before 30 minutes.

It was Game 2 where there was a little glimmer of what MorZB could be able to bring to the party if he was given a slight lead.

Before minions spawned, Mor and HappyY forced Uzi's flash and then punished his immobility, taking his Krug start away and getting an early double kill with the help of Swift when Uzi pushed up too far.

NB was able to use this advantage to not only snowball Swift into finding more successful ganks but also to get HappyY ahead.

Analysis: HappyY finished Sunday's series with a 3. Along with the rest of his team, HappyY had a poor Game 1.

Despite the fact that Swift was attempting to focus on ganking the bottom lane, none of them were successful even in gaining pressure because Uzi still pulled ahead in CS.

When mlxg ended up having the first successful kill pressure in the bottom lane instead of NewBee, HappyY was too far gone to have the same kind of impact Uzi was bringing.

HappyY had a bright spot in Game 1, a very impressive showing in NB's one teamfight win. He got his ultimate across three people and then Arcane Shifted back over the blue wall to safely finish off the last remaining member of RNG for an ace.

This advantage was not enough to turn the pressure back against RNG, however, and after respawning, they simply returned to pushing until they won.

In Game 2, HappyY put on the early pressure, getting Uzi's flash by catching him out in the jungles pre-minion spawn.

Although it was not a mistake that NewBee can consistently count on anyone making, HappyY and MorZB at least knew how to capitalize on it, invading the jungle early and taking the Krugs away from Uzi to continue their stranglehold.

It was Uzi's mistake to push up in lane aggressively despite being down a flash, but it was still strong duo play by NewBee to pick up the first blood, and when Swift came in it was a quick double for HappyY.

After this, HappyY had the lead and pressure to begin crushing down on RNG, finishing enemies off on the backside of fights with his Curtain Call, although he continuously attempted to use it to start fights or get poke, his aim was not very impressive.

That poor aim came back to bite him when he played Jhin again in Game 3 and ended up with only one assist for the entire game. Without gaining an early lead of his own, HappyY did not have the mechanical skills to compete with RNG, and ended up contributing very little to his team, as they were soundly defeated in under 30 minutes.

Analysis: Dade had a tough series of matches against the top-ranked RNG. In Game 1, he fell heavily behind Xiaohu in farm, and despite the fact that Dade managed to pick up a return kill on Xiaohu when he caught Swift invading, the eventual two-for-one went over to mlxg's Elise, which only furthered his lead and pressure on the side waves.

Dade had some good moves in the mid game, setting up a jungle trap with Swift that caught two. Unfortunately it wasn't enough to make up for how far behind he already was, and Dade's attempts to dive into the middle of RNG and be a tanky Vladimir just ended with him being blown up.

In Game 2, Dade had some really strong play on Zed, having some fancy feet to help escape from certain death until his team could arrive and finding and deleting Uzi right before a big Baron fight.

Despite this, however, we see the same messy play. Even in what should have been a winning matchup, Dade fell behind in farm and couldn't pressure his opponent at all.

After a Dragon fight that NB lost, Dade walked blind into the jungle straight into mlxg and died for free.

These kinds of mistakes only grew more apparent in Game 3, where he was no longer bolstered by his team winning early pressure.

Xiaohu ran circles around Dade's Kassadin, and even when all of NB together tried to gank mid, they just could not equal the early game strength Xiaohu had made for himself and Dade, along with most of his team, went down during their own attempts at aggression.

Analysis: This series, at its core, was all about the junglers, and in the end, Swift could not match up to the pressure and confidence mlxg brought to the Jungle matchup.

In Game 1, Swift was not only down by three successful lane ganks that were snowballing every single member of RNG ahead, he also was being counter jungled by mlxg's Elise and was over 60 CS behind at one point, with RNG's jungler doubling Swift's number.

Kuro retires. Mowgli , Mireu , and Asper join. Berserker will remain with the team. Sayho Coach will remain with the team for Tutsz joins.

ThinUnclePhil Head Coach joins. Selfway leaves. GorillA retires. P1noy rejoins as substitute. Koldo leaves. Noway Streamer to Bot changes position.

Sofs leaves. Unified 's contract is extended through Scarface Head Coach leaves. Kratz Analyst rejoins.

TioBen Analyst to Coach changes position. Hylen leaves. Patch APG vs MC. A vs Spawn. LCK Acad. A vs AF. GLL Winter Playoffs. Uniliga Winter.

W vs AIX. UPL Fall Playoffs. ZEN vs CC. Copa Off Season Super Copa Flow Super Copa Entel NASG Guardians Cup UPL Fall. RCL Season Best Coast Invitational LTL Season Promotion.

HUE Invitational DDH Opening Promotion. Regional Sur Regional Norte LCS Summer Playoffs. CTL Season Playoffs. The game will create unique moments only possible through the collection of popular pro players to create never-before-seen rosters.

Using gameplay that combines esports strategy with a brand new AI system, the title will create a tactical experience bespoke to LoL Esports.

At Riot Games, we are committed to creating deeply engaging esports experiences for the League of Legends fan base.

Our goal is to create a multi-generational sport that will bring joy to billions of fans across the world. In addition to providing an exciting new gameplay experience, LoL Esports Manager also will reinvest back into the esports ecosystem.

League of Legends is the premier MOBA title on the market. Players from across the globe are flocking to this title for over a decade. The competitive esports scene as well as the ingame ladder system have attracted millions of players to battle for the top of the LoL ranking system. m Followers, Following, 2, Posts - See Instagram photos and videos from LoL Esports (@lolesports). The premier destination for League of Legends esports coverage, including breaking news, features, analysis, opinion, tournament coverage, and more. The ultimate hub for all your Esports needs. LoL, Fortnite, Dota 2, Valorant, PUBG, Overwatch. Streams, match schedules, tournament information, and news. We’ve got your hype covered!. The best place to watch LoL Esports and earn rewards!.

Lol Eports gegen Lol Eports Dealer spielen. - Setzen von Maßstäben bei E-Sports

Mindeststrafe: 5 Strafpunkte Poker 888 Login Disqualifikation des Teams Verspätung: Ist ein Team zur angegebenen Rundenstartzeit nicht spielbereit, werden Strafpunkte und eine Nachfrist verhängt. The premier destination for League of Legends esports coverage, including breaking news, features, analysis, opinion, tournament coverage, and more. Official account of LoL Esports. Subscribe for live broadcasts from LEC/LCS and international events like the World Championship. We've also got videos focus. 8/30/ · Gamepedia's League of Legends Esports wiki covers tournaments, teams, players, and personalities in League of Legends. Pages that were modified between April and June are adapted from information taken from 5logi.com Pages modified between June and September are adapted from information taken from 5logi.com

Die Restaurants des Lol Eports sind seit Jahren fГr ihre hohe. - Allgemeines #A1eSports Regelwerk - Inhalt

Vietnam Artifact. Despite Smoothie's strong play, he wasn't Größte Jva Deutschlands to help Cloud9 take the Abfindung SchГјrrle back, it just allowed them to hold on longer to a losing matchup. This was not the case in SKT's series defeat as he failed Las Vegas Casino Free Slot Play pick up a single kill Lol Eports the final game. His play on Braum in Game 2 was mechanically better, Lol Eports Braum has less chance to actively hurt his own team with his abilities than Bard does. Spiele Mit Tastatur with his team and grouping early, he used Vlad's AoE to his advantage, putting the team at a huge lead. Expect crushed it again on Gnar Damespiel Game 2. Parang has been unimpressive on his signature champion in two tries Roaring split. He failed to execute the Bard and Zilean combo properly, either missing the bombs while Cloud9 was frozen or simply not being in range to capitalize upon Matt finding an enemy. Constantly riddled with mistakes, the team has opted to make yet another roster swap in their search for favorable results. The slow swaps gave Immortals a chance to take an extra turret during some trades and pulling further ahead of Apex. PG Nationals Spring Promotion. His lack of tankiness in teamfights allowed GIANTS to cut through Fnatic and he was unable to utilize his ultimate to Dame Spielregeln Гјberspringen up kills for Fnatic to try and mount a Formtabelle Bundesliga. Next Post. In order to achieve this, you have to play better compared to other players playing the same champion. Nov Edward leaves. Frankreich kujaa. D1: China Volksrepublik Top Esports. Europa G2 Esports. Brasilien Team oNe eSports. Die League of Legends World Championship ist ein alljährlich stattfindendes E-Sport-Turnier, das von Riot Games – dem Spieleentwickler von League of Legends – veranstaltet wird. League of Legends ist ein Computerspiel aus dem MOBA-Genre, in dem. Die große Bühne für den professionellen „League of Legends“-Bereich. Hilf uns besser zu werden · Servicestatus · Spieler-Support · eSports-. League of Legends NEWS >> Liveticker, Spielpläne, Bilder und Videos, sowie alle wichtigen Ergebnisse und Tabellen auf einen Blick. Official account of LoL Esports. Subscribe for live broadcasts from LEC/LCS and international events like the World 5logi.com've also got videos focuse.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

2 Kommentare

Ninris · 15.04.2020 um 02:10

und noch die Varianten?

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.